How to improve business

That doesn’t mean that die-hard Chrome or Firefox fans are out of luck, however: the Windows 10 Netflix app also renders Netflix in 1080p. (So does Apple’s Safari, though we do not endorse running a Windows browser that hasn’t been updated since 2012.) In a blog post, Microsoft claimed Microsoft Edge was built to take advantage of platform features in Windows 10, including the PlayReady Content Protection and the media engine’s Protected Media Path. The company said it is working with the Open Media Alliance to develop nextgeneration media formats, codecs, and other technologies for UltraHD video, and with chipset companies to develop Enhanced Content Protection that moves the protected media path into peripheral hardware for an even higher level of security, and one that could be used to protect 4K media. That’s in the future, though. Currently there are many TVs and devices that support 4K Netflix streaming and the PC isn’t one of them. Still, if you’re the type of person who steals 20 minutes to watch part of an episode at lunch, and you demand the best quality possible, make sure you load up Edge.


For example, it could be easier to fit screens around the contours of a battery and other components. It will also provide a level of flexibility in how a user can change the shape of a device. But challenges remain in making such screens practical, Kang said. A display has multiple functional layers such as cover lenses, touch panels, and polarizers, all made of different materials. A large number of layers could limit the ability to bend and fold. But removing layers also presents problems. For example, removing the touch panel could make such a screen useless for smartphones and tablets. The size of batteries and circuits are of lesser concern in designing bendable screens, Kang said. The screens can be folded around components. Displays that can fold and roll are an extension of flexible displays, which are already in wearables, smartphones, and TVs. For example, some TVs have flexible screens that are designed so that they can be slightly curved. Samsung and LG started using flexible AMOLED displays in smartphones in 2013 and are adapting those screens for wearables. Those companies are also leading the charge to bring displays that can bend and fold to devices. The sorts of flexible displays that are used in curved products are still in their infancy, but IHS projects such screens to continue siphoning market share from non-flexible displays. In 2022, 433.3 million flexible displays will ship, compared to 3.6 billion units of nonflexible displays.

That’s an all-star lineup, but purists may be disappointed that Nintendo went with the re-release version of Punch Out!! that drops Mike Tyson from the game. There’s also a couple of games in this list that were retro games even on the NES, including the Donkey Kong games and Pac-Man. Still, it’s nice to see these “retro retro” games included, since Nintendo’s classic library wouldn’t be complete without them. The story behind the story: Nintendo’s plan may seem a little ridiculous to emulation fans. Within half an hour, you can go from zero to a full NES gaming setup on a Raspberry Pi that plugs into your TV’s HDMI port. But those setups, such as RetroPie (retropie.org.uk), only provide the games in their original form, and sometimes they won’t play at all or are a little buggy. On top of that, you won’t have the controller or the new builtin suspend points to save your progress. Not to mention the fact that the games you download for RetroPie aren’t legitimate copies anyway, and emulation’s a legal grey area. The mini NES isn’t really for technically capable people who know how to cobble together a Raspberry Pi, anyway. This console will appeal to the masses who still harbor fond memories of their NEStinged childhood. When those people see this console on store shelves–and for just $60–there will no doubt be a lot of impulse buys so parents can replay these games with their kids.